Hypotheses

Grand and Unifying

Finding out the person I’m interested in has a lot of emotional baggage

whatshouldwecallme:

image

“The album has a gauzy, banged-up feeling, like karaoke versions of songs you dimly remember, processed until they sound like songs you definitely don’t know.”

—   Sasha Frere-Jones reviews EMA’s new album, “The Future’s Void,” in the magazine this week (subscription required): http://nyr.kr/1ea1wKv (via newyorker)
explore-blog:

For National Poetry Month, Mary Oliver on the mystery of the human psyche, the secret of great poetry, and how rhythm makes us come alive.
Excerpt illustrated by Wendy MacNaughton. 

“I used to think I was the strangest person in the world but then I thought there are so many people in the world, there must be someone just like me who feels bizarre and flawed in the same ways I do. I would imagine her, and imagine that she must be out there thinking of me too. Well, I hope that if you are out there and read this and know that, yes, it’s true I’m here, and I’m just as strange as you.”
― Frida Kahlo

newyorker:

A cartoon by Roz Chast. For more cartoons from the issue: http://nyr.kr/1hsBukx

newyorker:

A cartoon by Roz Chast. For more cartoons from the issue: http://nyr.kr/1hsBukx

explore-blog:

"Road Trips" by New Yorker artist Adrian Tomine, from New York Drawings. 

explore-blog:

"Road Trips" by New Yorker artist Adrian Tomine, from New York Drawings

“His eyes flit without rest from television screen, to newspaper, to magazine, keeping him in a sort of orgasm-without-release through a series of teasing glimpses of shiny automobiles, shiny female bodies, and other sensuous surfaces”

—   

Alan Watts, who pioneered Zen philosophy in the West, presages our modern media gluttony and the afflictions of the modern mind in 1951. (via explore-blog)

yup

(Source: , via explore-blog)

“When I decided to stop writing about five years ago I [sat] down to reread the 31 books I’d published between 1959 and 2010. I wanted to see whether I’d wasted my time. You never can be sure, you know. My conclusion, after I’d finished, echoes the words spoken by an American boxing hero of mine, Joe Louis. He was world heavyweight champion from the time I was 4 until I was 16. He had been born in the Deep South, an impoverished black kid with no education to speak of, and even during the glory of the undefeated 12 years, when he defended his championship an astonishing 26 times, he stood aloof from language. So when he was asked upon his retirement about his long career, Joe sweetly summed it up in just 10 words. “I did the best I could with what I had.””

—   

Philip Roth on his life as a writer.

To do the best we can with what we have, isn’t that the meaning of life?

(via explore-blog)

OR:

the best we can with what we don’t have. 

“We can navigate these difficulties of love — and enhance its joys — by grasping the significance of two great tragedies in the history of the emotions. The first is that we have lost knowledge of the different varieties of love that existed in the past, especially those familiar to the ancient Greeks, who knew love could be discovered not just with a sexual partner, but also in friendships, amongst strangers, and with themselves. The second tragedy is that over the last thousand years, these varieties have been incorporated into a mythical notion of romantic love, which compels us to believe that they can all be found in one person, a unique soulmate. We can escape the confines of this inheritance by looking for love outside the realm of romantic attachments, and cultivating its many forms.”

—   History’s forgotten wisdom on how to live and love (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

explore-blog:

The Principles of Uncertainty
More Kalman gold here.